Polk County Paternity Attorneys

Polk County Paternity Attorneys

Our Polk County paternity lawyers will be your aggressive advocates to get you the results that you need in your case to be successful so you can focus on what matters.

Our

Polk County Paternity Attorneys

Provide Excellent Service in:

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You Don't Have to Leave Your Home For Your

Paternity

Matter

In this video, attorney Kevin O'Flaherty describes ways you can receive legal services from the comfort of home.

Take the Next Step: Schedule a Free Consultation With Our

Polk County Paternity Attorneys

What to Expect From a Consultation

The purpose of a free consultation is to determine whether our firm is a good fit for your legal needs. Although we often discuss expected results and costs, our attorneys do not give legal advice unless and until you choose to retain us. Although most consultations are complimentary, some may carry a charge depending on the type of matter and meeting location.

Please contact our friendly

Polk County Paternity Attorneys

at our nearest location to schedule a free consultation:

O'Flaherty Law of Des Moines

2716 Grand Ave., Ste. 2 Des Moines, IA 50312

Phone:

(515) 207-2006

E-Mail:

desmoines.ia@oflaherty-law.com

Hours: 9 am - 7 pm Monday - Friday 11 am - 3pm Saturday 11 am - 2 pm Sunday

See below for our other locations. If our office locations are not convenient for you, we are happy to speak with you by phone.  ​​​

Some of Our Accomplishments

Naperville attorney
DuPage County Probate Attorney
Learn More About Our Firm
polk county family attorneys

Polk County Paternity Attorneys

Kevin O'Flaherty oversees all legal matters and is actively involved in making sure every client's case, big or small, is handled with excellence and attention to detail. He is available to contact through phone and email and his rates are available upon request.

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Polk County Paternity Attorneys

Polk County Paternity Attorneys

Or Continue Scrolling Below to Browse some of our Most Helpful Articles

Iowa Paternity Law Explained

In this article, our Polk County paternity attorneys explain Iowa Paternity Law. When a child is born to a married couple, the husband is automatically considered the legal father, and the rights of the mother and father are clear.  If a child is born to an unmarried couple, there are three ways to establish paternity in the state of Iowa.  The first option is for the couple to fill out a “paternity affidavit” form, which is commonly provided by the hospital in which the child is born.  Another option is to have paternity established via a paternity order issued by the Iowa Department of Human Services (Office of Child Support Recovery Services, or CSRA) or a judge of the circuit court.  The final option is for the couple to get married, but this must occur before the arrival of the baby for paternity to be legally established with no further action required.

In this Learn About Law video, our Polk County attorneys discuss and explain current Iowa​ paternity​ laws​ including how is paternity established in Iowa, Iowa paternity affidavits and paternity orders.

What Can a Father Do If His Name is Not On The Birth Certificate in Iowa?

In this video, our Polk County paternity attorneys explain how in Iowa, if a father’s name is not on a birth certificate, they will usually not have custodial rights of a parent, absent other action. The exception is if the mother and father are married at the time of birth. If the mother and father are married, Iowa law assumes the husband is the father.

In this Learn About Law video, our Polk County attorneys discuss other ways a father may establish himself as a parent if his name is not on the birth certificate.

Iowa Child Custody Law Explained

In this video, our Polk County paternity attorneys explain how Iowa Law requires that the court consider the best interests of the child and order​ a custody​ arrangement​ that will allow the child to maintain consistent physical and emotional contact with both parents whenever possible to encourage parents to share the rights and responsibilities of raising the child, so long as doing so will not cause physical or significant emotional harm to the children, other children, or either parent.  Custody is broken down into three parts: “joint legal custody,” “sole legal custody,” “physical placement.”

In this Learn About Law video, our Polk County attorneys discuss other ways a father may establish himself as a parent if his name is not on the birth certificate.

Further Reading From Our 

Polk County Paternity Attorneys