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Lisle Probate Attorneys | Lisle Estate Administration Attorneys | Guardianship Attorneys, Lisle IL

Lisle Probate Attorneys | Lisle Estate Administration Attorneys | Guardianship Attorneys, Lisle IL

Our Lisle probate attorneys are here to help if you are the executor or administrator of your loved one's estate. We focus on making the probate process as smooth, painless, and affordable as possible, so you can spend your time focusing on what matters: your family.

Our Lisle probate attorneys are here to help if you are the executor or administrator of your loved one's estate. We focus on making the probate process as smooth, painless, and affordable as possible, so you can spend your time focusing on what matters: your family.

Your Community Law Firm

Why O'Flaherty Law for My

Probate

Matter?

In this video, our Lisle Probate attorney describes why O'Flaherty Law is the best choice for your probate matter.

  • You And Your Family Will Be in Excellent Hands! Our firm has built a reputation for being great at what we do and for providing exceptional service and communication to our clients. Many of our clients have taken the time to leave us positive testimonials.  In 2016 we received the Avvo Client's Choice Award due to the overwhelmingly positive reaction from our clients.  In 2015 Kevin O'Flaherty was honored with Suburban Life Magazine's Best Under 40 Award.  Our Lisle probate attorneys are skilled, experienced, and singularly focused on amazing client service. 
  • We Are Cost Effective!  Our Lisle probate attorneys are cost-effective and efficient, with the goal of handling your loved-one's estate as expeditiously as possible. Choosing the wrong probate attorney can be unnecessarily expensive, but with O'Flaherty, you know you'll be getting the right help for an affordable cost.
  • We Are Comprehensive!  It is common for probate cases to require knowledge in many areas of law, such as real estate, family law, business law, or litigation.  Our team of knowledgeable Lisle attorneys collectively have experience in nearly every area of law.  We work as a team to make sure that you get the benefit of all of our experience.  

Some of Our Accomplishments

Schedule a Free Consultation With Our

Lisle Probate Attorneys

Please contact our friendly

Lisle Probate Attorneys

at our nearest location to schedule a free consultation:

O'Flaherty Law of Downers Grove

5002 Main Street, Ste 201
Downers Grove
,
IL
60515
Get Directions

See below for our other locations. If our office locations are not convenient for you, we are happy to speak with you by phone.  ​​​

Hours: 9 am - 5 pm Mon - Fri

Our  Office Locations: 

Downers Grove Attorneys, Downers Grove Attorney, Downers Grove Lawyer, Downers Grove Lawyers

Downers Grove

5002 Main St, Ste. 201 Downers Grove, IL 60515

Naperville Attorney, Naperville Attorneys, Naperville Lawyers, Naperville Lawyer

Naperville

105 Jackson Avenue, Ste. 4b Naperville, IL 60540

Elmhurst Lawyer, Elmhurst Lawyers, Elmhurst Attorneys, Elmhurst Attorney

Elmhurst

​110 E. Schiller Street, Ste. 220B ​Elmhurst, IL 60126

Lake in the Hills Attorneys, Lake in the Hills Attorney, Lake in the Hills Lawyer, Lake in the Hills Lawyers

Lake in the Hills

8411 Pyott Road, Ste. 107, ​Lake in the Hills, IL 60156

Tinley Park Attorney, Tinley Park Attorneys, Tinley Park Lawyer, Tinley Park Lawyers

Tinley Park

​16557 Oak Park Avenue, Ste. B, Tinley Park, IL 60477

St. Charles Attorneys, St. Charles Lawyers, St. Charles Attorney, St. Lawyer

St. Charles

210 S Fifth St, Ste. 107B, St. Charles, IL 60174

Meet Our Owner

Kevin O'Flaherty oversees all legal matters and is actively involved in making sure every client's case, big or small, is handled with excellence and attention to detail. He is available to contact through phone and email and his rates are available upon request.

Here's What Our Clients Have to Say:

John Paul Clancy
Says...

"Kevin and his firm, O'Flaherty Law, are friendly, efficient, knowledgeable and professional. Kevin is a master at bringing people together and sharing ideas."

Kevin Sender
Says...

"Kevin O'Flaherty and his team at O'Flaherty Law are among the friendliest and easiest to work with attorneys I've dealt with. I would suggest them to any friends or business associates."

Kevin O'Flaherty was instrumental during the purchase process of my new house. I highly recommend him and the entire firm!

An excellent client experience, I recommend O'Flaherty Law to all of my clients that have a need for consultation in family law.

DuPage Family Law AttorneyDowners Grove Estate Planning Attorney
John Paul Clancy
Says...
"Kevin and his firm, O'Flaherty Law, are friendly, efficient, knowledgeable and professional. Kevin is a master at bringing people together and sharing ideas."
DuPage Family Law AttorneyDowners Grove Estate Planning Attorney
Kevin Sender
Says...
"Kevin O'Flaherty and his team at O'Flaherty Law are among the friendliest and easiest to work with attorneys I've dealt with. I would suggest them to any friends or business associates."
DuPage Family Law AttorneyDowners Grove Estate Planning Attorney
Mike Stehlik
Says...
"Kevin and his team are my "Go To" resource for clients that need estate planning"
Kevin Koc
Says...
Kevin O'Flaherty was instrumental during the purchase process of my new house. I highly recommend him and the entire firm!
Stephen Petersen
Says...
An excellent client experience, I recommend O'Flaherty Law to all of my clients that have a need for consultation in family law.
Troy Golden
Says...
Kevin is an excellent attorney. He helped me incorporate by business and provides legal counsel as need. I highly recommend him.

Click here for Videos, Podcasts, and Articles by our Lisle Probate Attorneys

Or Continue Scrolling Below to Browse some of our Most Helpful Articles

What Happens When Minors Inherit Property?

In this episode of Learn About Law, we explain what happens when minors inherit property and explore the different possible scenarios, including if the decedent dies with a will, trust, or neither. #EstatePlanning #IllinoisLaw

When a minor inherits property in Illinois, how that property will be dealt with depends on whether the decedent (the person from whom the property is inherited) dies with a will, with a trust, or without either (intestate).  In this article, we will explain the results of the different potential scenarios.

1.  Decedent dies intestate (without a will or trust)

In the absence of a will or trust, the decedent’s estate will go through probate.  The probate court will appoint a guardian of the minor child’s estate.  This person will be responsible for managing the inherited assets of the minor until the minor reaches age 18, at which point the remaining assets will be paid out to the child.  The guardian of the estate will have the duty to preserve as much of the inheritance as possible for distribution to the child when the child reaches the age of majority.  He or she will be required to report periodically to the probate court until the assets are finally distributed and seek court approval for certain types of transfers.  The guardian of the estate may be a different individual than the guardian of the person (the individual with custody over the guardian).  However, in the absence of a will or trust naming a specific person as the guardian of the estate, the guardian of the person will often be named the guardian of the estate.  This is undesirable for divorcees who do not necessarily want their ex-spouse, who will likely be the custodial parent and guardian of the person,  to have control of their property.

Read More

When a minor inherits property in Illinois, how that property will be dealt with depends on whether the decedent (the person from whom the property is inherited) dies with a will, with a trust, or without either (intestate).  In this article, we will explain the results of the different potential scenarios.

1.  Decedent dies intestate (without a will or trust)

In the absence of a will or trust, the decedent’s estate will go through probate.  The probate court will appoint a guardian of the minor child’s estate.  This person will be responsible for managing the inherited assets of the minor until the minor reaches age 18, at which point the remaining assets will be paid out to the child.  The guardian of the estate will have the duty to preserve as much of the inheritance as possible for distribution to the child when the child reaches the age of majority.  He or she will be required to report periodically to the probate court until the assets are finally distributed and seek court approval for certain types of transfers.  The guardian of the estate may be a different individual than the guardian of the person (the individual with custody over the guardian).  However, in the absence of a will or trust naming a specific person as the guardian of the estate, the guardian of the person will often be named the guardian of the estate.  This is undesirable for divorcees who do not necessarily want their ex-spouse, who will likely be the custodial parent and guardian of the person,  to have control of their property.

Read More

Learn About When Probate is Necessary

Lisle Probate Attorneys, Lisle Probate Lawyer, Lisle Estate Administration Attorneys, Lisle Guardianship Attorneys

Lisle Probate Attorneys, Lisle Probate Lawyer, Lisle Estate Administration Attorneys, Lisle Guardianship Attorneys

Probate is a court case in which the court oversees the distribution of a decedent's assets to his or her heirs and creditors.  In order to administer an estate in Illinois, probate will be necessary if:

‍(1) The decedent owned any real estate outside of a trust that is not deeded with a right to survivorship for the decedent's spouse (even if there is a mortgage) outside of a trust; OR 

(2) The decedent owned more than $100,000.00 in assets outside of either a trust or outside of accounts that are payable to a direct beneficiary upon death.

If probate is necessary, the person responsible for administering the estate, known as the executor, must have letters of office issued by the probate court before he or she can begin collecting the decedent's assets for distribution to creditors and heirs.  The executor will also have to file accountings, notices, and reports with the court regarding the collection and distribution of these assets.

How To Administer An Estate In Ten Steps

If you are the Executor or Trustee of an estate you should have our Lisle probate attorneys handle the legal aspects of estate administration.  However, even when working with a probate attorney, there are still several actions you will need to take on your own.  For a more detailed description of each of these actions, please read our Learn About Law article on the probate process here:

  • Open an estate checking account
  • Keep good records of transactions dealing with the estate
  • Deposit cash you receive into your estate checking account
  • Gather a thorough list of assets owned by the decedent
  • Manage the estate by disconnecting utilities and filing a change of address
  • Managing finances and close credit card accounts
  • Pay any debts from estate checking account
  • Once all creditors have been paid, distribute remaining balance to the heirs of the estate as directed by decedents will or trust.
  • File income and estate tax returns

Let us help you through the process, which can be overwhelming. We want to make the process as easy as possible for you in your time of need.

If you are the Executor or Trustee of an estate you should have our Lisle probate attorneys handle the legal aspects of estate administration.  However, even when working with a probate attorney, there are still several actions you will need to take on your own.  For a more detailed description of each of these actions, please read our Learn About Law article on the probate process here:

  • Open an estate checking account
  • Keep good records of transactions dealing with the estate
  • Deposit cash you receive into your estate checking account
  • Gather a thorough list of assets owned by the decedent
  • Manage the estate by disconnecting utilities and filing a change of address
  • Managing finances and close credit card accounts
  • Pay any debts from estate checking account
  • Once all creditors have been paid, distribute remaining balance to the heirs of the estate as directed by decedents will or trust.
  • File income and estate tax returns

Let us help you through the process, which can be overwhelming. We want to make the process as easy as possible for you in your time of need.

What You Need to Know About Opening a Probate Estate

Lisle Probate Attorneys, Lisle Probate Lawyer, Lisle Estate Administration Attorneys, Lisle Guardianship Attorneys

In order to open a probate estate, our Lisle probate attorneys will file several documents with the probate court:

  • Petition for Issuance of Letters of Office and Admission of Will:   This petition requests that a probate case be opened.  If there is a will, the petition requests that the will be admitted to probate.  It also requests that an order be issued by the court naming the petitioner as executor of the estate.  This order is called "Letters of Office," and it gives the executor the power to collect the assets of the estate and distribute them to creditors and heirs or legatees.  
  • Affidavit of Heirship - The Affidavit of Heirship lists the individuals who stand to inherit from the estate.  If there is a will, these individuals are called "legatees."  In the absence of a will, they are called "heirs." 
  • Affidavit as to Copy of Will - This is a sworn statement by the executor that, to the best of the executor's knowledge, the will be submitted to the probate court is accurate and the most recently executed will. 
  • Oath of Office - This is an written oath sworn by the executor to fulfill his or her fiduciary duties associated with the administration with the estate. 
  • Surety Bond or Non-Surety Bond - In order to initiate a probate case, a bond must be obtained by the executor from an insurance company to insure against the executor's mishandling of assets. 
  • Notice to Heirs and Legatees - A notice that the executor must mail to all individuals who stand to inherit from the estate informing them that the probate case has been opened. 
  • Publication Notice - Unknown creditors of the deceased must be informed that the probate case has been opened through publication in a newspaper for three consecutive weeks. 

Upon filing of these documents, a hearing will be held to appoint the executor and admit the will to probate.   

Read more about how to open a probate case.

Further Reading from our

Lisle Probate Attorneys